News  »  Cryotherapy explained: Why Hugh Jackman and other celebrities are exposing themselves to sub-zero temperatures in the name of health

Cryotherapy explained: Why Hugh Jackman and other celebrities are exposing themselves to sub-zero temperatures in the name of health

  • Hugh Jackman, 48, shared a video of himself using a cryotherapy tank this week
  • The star is known for being in incredible shape and shared one of his secrets
  • Full body cryotherapy blasts sub-arctic air on people for three minutes
  • Tanks have cryogenic nitrogen vapor and reaches negative 200 degrees F. 
  • The therapy manages pain, restores blood vessels and can smooth skin 

Hugh Jackman was recently seen climbing into a sub-arctic tank, all in the name of of the latest health trend.

The A-list actor is known being in incredible shape as a result of grueling workouts he is put through for movies.

Now Jackman, 48, revealed that one of his secrets in maintaining his body is cryotherapy.

Although freezing temperature treatments have been around for centuries, there has been a recent surge in cryotherapy’s popularity because of its many health benefits.

So what is this popular treatment and why is it good for the body?

Hugh Jackman, 48, was recently seen climbing into a sub-arctic cryotherapy tank,
The tank can manage pain, restore blood vessels and smooth skin

Hugh Jackman, 48, was recently seen climbing into a sub-arctic cryotherapy tank, which can manage pain, restore blood vessels and smooth skin

The A-list actor is known being in incredible shape as a result of grueling workouts he is put through for movies. Whole body cryotherapy was originally developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in Japan in 1978 

The A-list actor is known being in incredible shape as a result of grueling workouts he is put through for movies. Whole body cryotherapy was originally developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in Japan in 1978

What is cryotherapy?

Cryotherapy is a restorative and therapeutic treatment used for managing pain, smoothing skin and encouraging weight loss.

The term comes from the Greek language, which translates to ‘cold cure’.

These icy techniques have been around for ages, dating back to the 17th century.

Athletes have long submerged themselves in baths of ice or used ice packs for recovery and to help numb pain.

Whole body cryotherapy was originally developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in Japan in 1978.

Jackman was seen using a cryotherapy tank, seemingly something out of a science-fiction film with fog and flashing lights.

Even Roxy's doing it! Hugh joins a long list of celebrities who have tried out cryotherapy, which reportedly assists in weight loss and muscle recovery. Pictured: PR queen Roxy Jacenko

Even Roxy’s doing it! Hugh joins a long list of celebrities who have tried out cryotherapy, which reportedly assists in weight loss and muscle recovery. Pictured: PR queen Roxy Jacenko

CAN CYROTHERAPHY CAN HELP BRONCHITIS?

Could freezing the airways help patients with chronic bronchitis?

The treatment is to freeze liquid nitrogen is sprayed into the airways to destroy malfunctioning nerves,

The theory is that the cycle of freezing and thawing destroys the tissue, allowing healthy cells to develop in their place, and improves breathing. The cycle can be repeated several times.

The approach has been used to treat Barrett’s esophagus, a pre-cancerous disease caused by chronic acid reflux, and esophageal cancer.

The flash-freeze and slow thaw of tissue has been shown to destroy targeted cells, but doesn’t affect collagen, the tough fibrous protein that provides a scaffold for healthy tissue to regrow.

The tanks dip below freezing temperatures by using cryogenic nitrogen vapor and reach negative 200 degrees Fahrenheit.

It can be an expensive beauty regimen, costing anywhere from $50 to $100 per session.

Why is it good for the body?

Cryotherapy stimulates the body’s response to cold in order to reduce swelling and inflammation.

Rex Sharp, the University of Missouri’s associate athletic director for sports medicine, said his athletes use the tank primarily for recovery after workouts.

Sharp said: ‘When you get into an area of cold, the blood vessels on the skin shut down and the blood returns to the core.

‘In the core the blood is reoxygenated. When you step into warmer weather, that blood rushes back out. You just feel invigorated, refreshed.’

Sharp explained that the tanks’ freezing temperatures help boost blood circulation, which clears toxins such as lactic acid from the body.

This process helps both muscle and skin regeneration, making it a perfect therapy for recovering athletes.

Previous studies have shown extreme cold can stimulate the body into burning up fat deposits and some claim the tanks can burn up to 800 calories in just three minutes.

Some women have even jumped into tanks right before their weddings because the sessions can boost complexions, encourage hair growth, improve skin tone and banish the appearance of cellulite.

Jackman joins a long list of celebrities who have tried out the therapy, including Mandy Moore
Derek Hough was seen freezing in a tank

Jackman joins a long list of celebrities who have tried out the therapy, including Mandy Moore (left) Demi Lovato and Derek Hough (right)

Who else has done cryotheraphy?

Jackman isn’t the only celebrity to freeze himself.

He joins a long list of celebrities who have tried out the treatment, including Mandy Moore, Demi Lovato and Derek Hough.

Sydney publicist Roxy Jacenko recently added the therapy into her fitness routine, saying she spends up to two minutes inside a chamber every other day.

The Sweaty Betty PR founder, 36, has claimed she noticed an increase in her energy levels since beginning treatment.

Australian socialite Jessie Murphy (née Habermann) also underwent cryotherapy treatment before her wedding to AFL player Marc Murphy.

Comment Below

Your email address will not be published.